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LAST UPDATED: June 26th 2020 GUIDE: Chris Browning Maybe you’re looking at buying a Ruger American semi-automatic pistol. Like me, you might have searched their website and… whoa! There are more than a dozen to choose from . What’s the difference between them? And how can you make up your mind? You should consider what you want to do with your Ruger.

Best Deer Hunting Rifle [Ruger American Review 2020]

Best Deer Hunting Rifle [Ruger American Review 2020]LAST UPDATED: June 26th 2020 GUIDE: Chris Browning Maybe you’re looking at buying a Ruger American semi-automatic pistol. Like me, you might have searched their website and… whoa! There are more than a dozen to choose from . What’s the difference between them? And how can you make up your mind? You should consider what you want to do with your Ruger. Are you after an on-duty weapon for law enforcement or security? Or do you plan to carry it concealed for self-defense? The Ruger American offers numerous benefits for either of those applications. This includes LoMount Carry three-dot sights, extended magazines, and recoil-reducing barrel. There are different barrel sizes to appeal to both concealed carry or on-duty folks. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 What to Remember When Purchasing 2 Features of "The Ruger American" 3 Ruger American Models (Full List) 4 Alternatives to the Ruger American 5 Final Thoughts on the American What to "Remember When Purchasing" There are 11 models of the American in 9mm and 5 models in .45 ACP. If you want to know more about ammunition calibers, visit our bullets guide. Some of these differences are in magazine capacity; Model 8618 holds only 10 rounds, while the 8605 has a 17-round magazine. This may not seem like a big deal if you’re carrying for self-defense, but for law enforcement, 17 rounds sound pretty good. Some models, like the 8637, have shorter barrels. This might be a good option for concealed carry or even as a concealed backup. The shorter barreled pistols have a smaller magazine capacity, making them easier to conceal. All models of the Ruger American come with a Picatinny accessory rail on the underside of the frame. This enables you to add features like a laser sight or flashlight. There are holsters available that would enable you to carry the firearm with the accessories, but you’d have to check to make sure they would fit your Ruger and light combo. Features of The Ruger American Product Specs Manufacturer: Ruger Type: Handgun Caliber: 9mm / .45 ACP Product Features Modular grip system Ambidextrous slide and magazine release Small (9mm only), medium, and large grip modules Click Here for Price All models of the American come with the same features, though some are 9mm and others are .45 ACP. They also vary in magazine capacity. Let’s discuss the main features before we move on to the specific models. The Ruger American has… Trigger with short takeup and positive reset. Recoil-reducing barrel Tested for extended +P ammunition use NovakⓇ LoMount Carry 3-dot sights; interchangeable sights Modular grip system Easy no-tool or trigger pull breakdown Ambidextrous slide and magazine release 2 magazines Small (9mm only), medium, and large grip modules Powerful striker spring to lighten trigger pull Picatinny accessory rail Visual loaded/empty chamber indicator Trigger safety NovakⓇ LoMount 3-dot Sights NovakⓇ 3-dot sights are premium, user-friendly sights that won’t snag on clothing or holsters. They’re designed for quick front sight acquisition for fast and accurate shots. These sights are finished with black nitride for ultimate sleekness. The white dots provide a high level of contrast. Modular Grip System Each Ruger American comes with an interchangeable modular grip system. 9mm firearms will come with small, medium, and large grip modules, making it easy to customize the grip. .45 caliber handguns come with the medium and large grips. The grips are easy to remove and replace. Ambidextrous Slide and Magazine Release Lefties have a difficult time in the right-handed world, but the Ruger American answers their challenge. Both the magazine and the slide stop (release) appear on both sides of the firearm. For those who shoot left-handed, this is a definite plus! Picatinny Rail All Ruger American models come with a frame-molded Picatinny rail. It’s easy to slide on flashlights, laser sights ( like this one ), or infrared illuminators. Recently, manufacturers have begun developing holsters that accommodate both gun and accessories. But, when you order one, make sure to find out if it will fit your firearm and accessory setup. Safety Features Ruger American Pro models don’t come with a manual safety, but those that do offer an ambidextrous safety. All models have an internal automatic sear block system and don’t require a trigger pull to complete the firearm breakdown process. All models do come with the trigger safety. "Ruger American Models" (Full List) Now we’ll talk about each model of Ruger American. 8605: this is Pro model is a 9mm, 17-round capacity handgun with a 4-inch barrel; no manual safety 8607: also 9mm, this carries 10 rounds and has a 4-inch barrel, but it doesn’t have a manual safety 8608: this 17-round 9mm does include a manual safety and has a 4-inch barrel 8615: a .45 auto Pro model with a 10-round capacity and a 4.5-inch barrel, it does not have a manual safety 8618: also a .45 auto, this 10-round pistol has a 3.5-inch barrel and manual safety 8633: this 10-round 9mm compact pistol has a manual safety and 3.5-inch barrel 8635: a Pro model 9mm, this 3.5-inch, 17-round pistol doesn’t have a manual safety 8637: this 10-round 9mm has a 4-inch barrel and does not have a manual safety 8638: holds 10 rounds, this 9mm has a 4-inch barrel and manual safety 8639: this is a 17-round 9mm with a 3.5-inch barrel and a manual safety 8645: this new .45 auto Pro 10-round  model has a 3.75-inch barrel, but no manual safety 8648: also new, this .45 auto 10-round has a manual safety and a 3.75-inch barrel 8661: a new 10-round 9mm with a 4-inch barrel and manual safety 8663: this new 9mm has a 10-round capacity, manual safety, and a 3.55-inch barrel 8680: a new 10-round .45, this pistol has a 4.5-inch barrel and a manual safety 8660: also new, this 17-round 9mm Pro model has a 4-inch barrel but no manual safety, and it’s a TALO Distributor Exclusive firearm. Another unique feature is the brown-colored slide. You can see the wide variety of options available in the Ruger American. Different styles, magazine capacity, caliber, and barrel sizes means there’s likely one that’s a perfect fit for you. Keep in mind, the Pro models do not come with the manual safety. Alternatives to the Ruger American In case you’d like to check out some guns that are like the American, we’ll give you a couple options for comparison. Both are in the same price range but offer different options. 1. Glock 21 The Glock 21 is a .45 caliber handgun with a 4.5-inch barrel and it’s widely used by law enforcement and military personnel. The 21 has either a 10- or 13-round capacity and it’s about the same in cost as the Ruger American. 2. Glock 17 The Glock 17 is the 9mm option with a 17-round capacity. It has a 4.5-inch barrel and a trigger safety. (Though when it comes down to it, I prefer the G19 for EDC). 3. Springfield XD The Springfield XD comes in both a 3-inch sub-compact and a 4-inch service model. It features the Ultra Safety Assurance (USA) Action Trigger System™ and has a grip safety in addition to a trigger safety. They’re priced about the same as a Glock. If you’re a beginner with gun carrying and shooting, here are some other good choices . Final Thoughts on the American You can see the Ruger American has numerous options and upgrades to choose from. They’re available in 9mm or .45 auto have varying barrel sizes to accommodate most shooters. The American comes with NovakⓇ LoMount 3-dot sights, with or without a manual safety, and two magazines, no matter if you choose the 10- or 13-round model. No matter if you’re a self-defense or law enforcement carrier, the Ruger American might be an excellent choice for you. It’s easy to disassemble whether in the field or at home because it doesn’t require any special tools. It also offers a recoil-reducing barrel, which makes shooting and then reacquiring the target quick and efficient. Related Reads: Ruger 10/22 Scope Best Ruger Mark III Holsters Top Five Holsters For Ruger LCR Ruger LCR Pocket Holsters Pocket Holsters For Ruger LC9S Holsters For Ruger LC9 Best SOB And OWB Holsters For The Ruger 9E Best Cross Draw Holster For Ruger 22/45 Best Holsters For Ruger P89 Leather Holster For Ruger Alaskan 5/5 (1 Review) 1 COMMENT Henry August 26, 2018 at 10:24 am Thank you for the review and the particulars of the American Pistol. I’ve been trying to decide on this pistol or the Ruger SR9c. My American choice would be model 8639. Both pistols have many of the same features but the American will shoot +P Ammo while the SR9c can’t. Again, thank you for the in-site Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

Primary Arms ACSS Reticle Coming to Trijicon ACOGs

Primary Arms ACSS Reticle Coming to Trijicon ACOGs

I have always wanted an ACOG with wind holds. Whenever I would take the ACOG to 500 or 600 yards I questioned my shot frequently in windy conditions. Did I miss because of the wind call? I didn’t want to dial in clicks on the ACOGs tiny windage dial and possibly lose track of my original zero… Well here is what I wanted in prototype form: the Primary Arms patented ACSS reticle will be making its way into the Trijicon ACOG line and I am eager to see this reticle as it has those wind values I wish my Ta31F had. I will be filming the PAC4x soon to evaluate how helpful those wind values are as it shares the same reticle with the ACOG prototypes shown here. I am fully HD capable now with 1080p 90x digital zoom and a much better microphone for the job. Let’s film bullets in flight. It will be elegant. Poetic even. Maybe. Stay tuned for the test of the ACSS 4x. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Bushnell Trophy Xtreme Spotting Scope Review

Bushnell Trophy Xtreme Spotting Scope Review

What You Will Get Here Specifications Feature Analysis Pros Cons Final Verdict Specifications Weight 31.4 ounces Item model number 886015 Eye Relief/Exit Pupil 16 mm/ 3.1-1 mm Length 13 inches Editor Rating : 4.3 out of 5 star Check Latest Price &; Reviews On Amazon A spotting scope is a fantastic device if you are a hunter, target shooter, bird watcher or engaged in any activity where improved vision to the targeted range. When you are trying to decide on the best spotting scope for your particular needs, Bushnell can be the great source of spotting scope what you are looking for. This article Bushnell Trophy Xtreme Spotting Scope Review will help you choose the best spotting scope for your needs. Bushnell Spotting Scope is designed with a tripod, 12 to 36x adjustable magnification, HD clarity spotting optics and the large objective lens make it ideal for seeing nature and animals from long distances. When you are looking for a quality and high performing spotting scope to use for outdoor activities, you have this Bushnell device to consider. Feature Analysis 1. Porro Prism Lens Though many optics producers keep on trying to transform roof prism lens, Porro prism lenses are more affordable and light-efficient. These Porro prism lenses can display images with better contrast than roof prism variations. This is how "Bushnell Spotting Scope" is more reliable and affordable for its high-quality performance. 2. 20-60×65 Zoom Magnification The wide range of magnification allows user flexibility for long-range view finding. You can observe details with 65x zoom for long range objects. But, you can still enjoy an increased field of view with 20x zoom. This is used when separating the areas for closer zoom viewing later on. 3. 65x Lens Light-Gathering Capability This advanced magnification lenses can light gather at long distances. The Bushnell Trophy 20-60x 65mm Waterproof Spotting Scope resolves this issue by designing 65x zoom lens in a way that brings 17% more light than most high-zoom lenses. If you fully read "Bushnell Trophy Xtreme" "Spotting Scope Review" , it will support you how to setting zoom for longer distances images. 4. Waterproof Construction When you go out in nature, this waterproof construction anticipates you about rain or even snow. It is pretty obvious that any liquid that leaks into your scope will detract from the overall image. But many people do not consider the effects of concentration on the inside of the lens. This spotting scope is actually water and fog proof not only for outside moisture but also prevents lens fogging from risky temperatures. 5. Fully Multi-Coated Optics The multi-coated lenses prevent any reflections in the glass that can delay your view. The sunlight at certain angles can cause reflections from water or wet surfaces that prevent the clear view of the images. That is why; Bushnell uses multi-coated lenses to remove any kind of reflection. 6. Well-designed Equipment The tripod often needs to hide from animals, and the scope cases also need to protect their insides from both jostling and the outside elements. The Bushnell Trophy XLT comes with both a hard-side case and a soft side case. The hard side case protects you from outside damage and a soft-side case protect you from a bumpy road when you are riding. Pros Compact Lightweight 2 comprised tripod mounts Complete equipment package Larger size available Fully Multi-coated optics Fully waterproof and fog proof Porro-Prism Lens Zoom flexibility Cons Quality control matters Tripod also does not come with actual vertical adjustment Final Verdict There are different spotting scopes available on the market, but not all scopes are created similarly. This Bushnell Trophy Xtreme Spotting Scope Review will introduce someone about this product Bushnell who is new to recreational activities. In our Bushnell Trophy Xtreme Spotting Scope review, we have considered the performance and quality one can enjoy from using this device with great care. The Bushnell Spotting Scope may be the best spotting scope for getting results desired by fans of wildlife. Although no spotting scopes are without limitations, so you should choose one that is durable and comfortable to use. Check "Latest Price &" ; Reviews On Amazon share share share share share

40 of the Best Hunting Apps to Help You Stay Connected

40 of the Best Hunting Apps to Help You Stay Connected

Smartphone apps have revolutionized the way humans go about our daily lives, as nowadays most people use a variety of apps for banking, online shopping and a range of other activities. In the world of hunting, apps have also begun to show their usefulness, with a huge number of hunters now relying on a variety of apps to assist them either out in the field or with planning their hunt. Still, with thousands upon thousands of different apps now available, this list will be focused on helping you determine which ones are actually worth your time. Therefore, without further ado, we now present you with our list of the top 40 best hunting apps currently available. Must-Haves: The 5 Best Hunting Apps of 2020 GEO-PAK Hunt A truly innovative app, GEO-PAK Hunt provides premium users with a huge range of features that allow you and your entire party to track the hunt in real time. Plan out your hunt before heading into the field using the GPS mapping function, and create up to 1,000 boundary points to ensure you stay within your hunting area. You can also save the directions to your stands so no one in the party gets lost. The app allows you to fully map out your entire hunting area, and even track your position and the position of everyone else in your party in real time using the camera feature. You’ll see instantly if the wind changes direction or anyone in your group starts moving. All members of the group must be connected to the app via GPS, and you can even put GPS trackers on your dogs to track their location as well. The app also offers a wide range of other features, allowing you to download trail cam pictures, view and analyze statistics of your hunts. Still, the most unique feature is the camera function, which gives you an augmented view of reality—allowing you to instantly find the range of any object, see exactly where every member of your party is, their distance from you and how fast they’re moving. GEO-PAK Hunt is available for both Android and iPhone, and best of all, premium subscriptions are quite affordable. Monthly, three-month hunting season and yearly subscriptions are available. Plus, you get to try out all of the premium features for free before you buy it, as all users receive a free one-week trial of GEO-PAK Hunt’s premium services after downloading the app. With all of the huge benefits provided by the premium subscription, there’s no doubt that GEO-PAK Hunt is one of the best hunting apps for Android and iPhone . Apple & Android- Free and Subscription versions available SAS Survival Guide One of the best-selling survival guides is now available in a handy Android and iPhone app. With SAS Survival Guide, you can be fully prepared for any situation you might encounter out in the wild. The app features a range of survival tips for every possible climate and a highly useful first aid section in case something should go wrong. It also includes a sun-compass, survival videos and a range of photo galleries to help you identify animal tracks, snakes, and plants that are poisonous, medicinal and edible. There’s also an entire section dedicated to knot tying should you need it. Even if you think you remember everything you were taught in Boy Scouts, there’s no telling what sort of situations you might encounter out in the field. Therefore, this app is truly a must-have, as it ensures that you’ll know exactly what to do should you find yourself in an emergency—no matter what type of emergency it is or where you’re located. Android and Apple users can take advantage of a free, ad-supported version (SAS Survival Guide Lite) or choose to download the paid version for a faster, cleaner experience. As well, there is also a special version produced especially for iPad. Apple & Android- $5.99/ iPad Version- $6.99 HuntStand One of the top free hunting apps on the market, HuntStand is a truly revolutionary hunting and land management app that provides a wide range of online and off-line features. Users can map out their hunt area using a variety of custom icons, view weather tracking information and share and edit maps with their friends. You can also upload hunting area maps to the app, and even access free property owner information and parcel boundaries for most of the country. HuntStand also features the unique HuntZone scent tool, which allows you to track exactly where your scent will be throughout the hunt based on wind speed, direction and time. With this tool, you can see exactly where you should set up to avoid your scent blowing your cover. Best of all, the app is entirely free, despite providing more and better features than many paid apps. Apple & Android- Free HuntWise: The Hunting App Produced by Sportsman Tracker, HuntWise does the work of several different apps in one. This free app is designed to help you more accurately predict the times when your hunt is most likely to be successful by using an algorithm based on your location, weather and when the animals are most likely to be active. The GPS hunting map-based prediction provides a five-day hunting forecast for turkey, deer or waterfowl, and can also be used to provide you with a detailed map overview of your entire hunting area. As well, the app lets you view hourly weather reports, and also contains a solunar hunting predictor that shows you the best times based on the current moon phase. With this free app, you can more accurately predict animal movements based on a range of different criteria, thus improving your odds of a successful hunt. As well, the app contains a range of GPS hunting maps that show private land ownership boundaries and a range of other info. Users also receive access to the HuntWise community, where they can share pictures and details of their hunts and interact with other hunters across the globe. Apple & Android- Free OnXmaps HUNT For those looking for a high-quality GPS app to use on their next hunt, onXmaps HUNT is without-a-doubt one of the best. More than a simple map, this app lets you view a huge range of features and information, including hunting trails, roads, public lands and private property ownership info. The free version of the app allows you to view hunting areas for every species in all 50 states, as well as aerial imagery and 24k topographic maps. This app also has state-wide and nation-wide subscription packages that provide you with access to a huge range of additional maps and info, such as ownership info, multiple game management units, walk-in area maps and much more. The statewide subscription provides access to all of this info for one state, while the national subscription provides info for the entire country. Either way, this app ensures you are fully prepared and will always know the lay of the land. Apple & Android- Free Best Bow Hunting Apps ArcheryPal Quite a handy tool for bow hunters, this app allows you to easily calculate your arrow speed and kinetic energy. The app also enables you to see whether or not your arrows are properly balanced. As well, ArcheryPal has a tool that allows you to keep track of your shooting sessions, logging where each shot hit on the target so you can monitor your accuracy percentage. You can also view graphs to track your overall progress and see if they any trends appear in your arrow placement over time, i.e. if your arrows are slowly drifting to one side or the other. APPTitune Created by professional competition archers, this app serves a comprehensive guide containing virtually everything you could need to know about setup and tuning of both compound and recurve bows. Learn about limb and cam alignment, stabilizer set-up, broadhead setup and arrow tuning, yoke tuning, bare-shaft tuning and a whole lot more. Simply put, this app gives you all the tools to ensure your bow is in proper working condition before heading out into the field. Apple & Android- $14.99 RealTree Archery Tips A great tool for beginning archers and younger hunters, this app is essentially a guide to archery and bow hunting, which provides a huge range of advice, tips and tricks on different shooting techniques, set-up, gear and more. The app features a wide range of info cards, each one providing useful details on a specific technique or topic. It also features a super-clean, easy-to-use interface that allows you to quickly scroll the cards to find exactly the info you’re looking for. Apple only- Free Best Calling Apps Primos Hunting Calls: Speak the Language One of the leaders in hunting calls and a wide range of other equipment, Primos has taken animal calls to the next level with this app. Of course, the usefulness of these calls depends on how far away the animals you’re trying to call are and how loud the speakers on your phone are (although you could always bring a small external speaker along). In truth though, that isn’t at all what this app was designed for, as its real usefulness is in helping you to improve your calling. The app features more than 20 interactive calls, separated into six different categories: Turkey, Predator, Elk, Deer, Waterfowl and Specialty. Each of the different calls is essentially a recording of one of Primos’ pros using one of its different animals calls, such as The Original Can, Hoochie Mama, The Gobbler or The Heart Breaker. Each call featured in the app also provides specific instructions on exactly how to use it in real life. By listening to the calls and then trying to mimic them, you’ll soon improve your skills so you’re better able to grunt, call or rattle an animal right to you on your next hunt. Apple & Android- $1.99. iHunt by Ruger While the range of calls in the Primos app is impressive, it comes nowhere near competing with iHunt by Ruger (not to be confused with iHunt Journal listed further down). This app is continuously being updated as more calls are added, and as of writing, it featured well over 700 different calls. In addition to your standard deer, elk and turkey calls, it also features a range of different calls for alligators, raccoons , squirrels, moose, geese and even exotic animals like zebra, wildebeest and lions. Multiple calls are available for most species, allowing you to vary up your calling to attract in even those ‘smarter’ animals. Apple & Android- Free Predator Hunting Calls With more than 12 of the most popular predator calls, this app allows you to call in coyotes, bobcats, foxes, cougars, wolves and other predators with ease. Use popular predator calls such as cottontail scream, jackrabbit scream, woodpecker distress, hurt pup, hurt fawn or coyote pack howl. Like the "Primos Hunting Calls" app, you will probably need to attach external speakers to broadcast the sound over a larger area. Still, unless you happen to be an expert caller, the range of calls in this app can surely increase your chances of success. Deer Calls and Tactics Pro One of the most popular deer call apps on the market, Deer Calls and Tactics Pro provides a complete library of deer calls at your fingertips, including popular and effective calls such as doe bleat, doe estrus bleat, doe grunt, contact call and buck grunt. Other calls include tending grunt, tending grunt-click, buck bawl, breeding bellow, rattling, sparring and snort-wheeze. In addition to the calls, the app also features tips on how to best make each sound, as well a range of other useful information. Find descriptions and calendars of the rut phases, tips and tactics for each phase of the moon and a full lunar calendar with ratings for each solunar day. All of these features make this one of the most useful and best deer hunting apps . Apple & Android- $2.99 Best GPS and Property Management Apps Whitetail Freaks Property Management With this property management app, users can fully map out their property using a range of features. Mark your boundary lines, add markers for your tree stand , food plots and trail cams, or use the overlay filters to find every single trail and road on the property. This app lets you manage hundreds of different properties, giving you instant access to the information to ensure you never get lost again. Apple & Android- $2.99 ScoutLook Hunting (aka ScoutLook Hunting & Weather) ScoutLook Hunting Weather allows users to instantly track the weather in their exact location. The app uses a geocoding function to provide precise location information, which is then used to provide real-time weather info and alerts. However, this is really much more than just a basic weather app, as it also enables you to save unlimited hunting locations and points of interest. As well, it also has a unique ScentCone Wind Map that lets you see exactly where your scent will blow hour by hour, for up to a 72-hour period. Furthermore, the app’s SetZone Wind Map is an ideal tool for waterfowl hunters, as it provides a 74-hour wind map that shows you precisely where you should set up your decoys—making it one of the best duck hunting apps currently available. Apple & Android- Free Where To Hunt This app allows you and other users to check-in when you reach the hunting area, thus alerting everyone using the app to your location. This can be especially useful in high traffic areas, as it essentially allows you to mark your spot. Other users can then see where you are located, and you can easily see if your favorite spot is taken when you arrive and find alternate routes to your chosen spot in case other hunters are blocking your primary route. You can also use the app solely for members of your hunting party, allowing each member to track each other’s locations. Plus, you have the option to hide the location of your party members from the general public. Your family members can also use the app on their phone or computer to track your movements in the field, a truly useful tool for those hunting alone, as it enables you to be easily found should an accident happen. Apple & Android- Free Google Earth Although there are other map apps out there, this is virtually the only one that allows you to view full topographic maps and satellite images to get a 3D overview of your hunting area. With this app, you can easily find and identify ridges, draws, creeks, natural funnels and other useful landmarks. Apple and Android- Free Best Weather Apps for Hunting AccuWeather One of the world’s top rated weather apps, AccuWeather offers a number of features that can be especially useful for hunters. The hourly, daily and weekly forecasts can help you plan out your hunt, while the weather radar allows you to see whether any storms may move in and threaten your hunt. As well, users also receive severe weather alerts for the area, alerting you that it might be time to pack it in and call it a day before a huge storm threatens to strand you. Apple & Android- Free WeatherBug Another one of the world’s top weather apps, WeatherBug provides users with a range of additional benefits not found in many other apps. Unfortunately, WeatherBug recently got rid of the paid version (WeatherBug Elite), meaning users are stuck having to view the annoying ads that come along with it. Still, considering its usefulness, most people don’t find this to be much of an issue. With this app, you can semi-accurately predict the hourly weather and use the radar function to monitor the path of storms. Apple & Android- Free Primos Wind With this app, you can monitor wind speed and direction in real time using the compass function on your camera. Most hunters know how quickly scent can give you away to an animal, which this app helps to eliminate by keeping you constantly informed about any changes in the wind. Still, it is really only useful for wind, which is why many hunters tend to stick with one of the many free weather apps available. Of course, for bow hunters, this wind info could be the difference between a hit and a miss, which helps to explain why this simple app remains so popular. Sunrise Sunset A simple app that provides precise, up-to-date sunrise and sunset information for your specific location. The app also allows you to track the movement of the sun, and also contains fun and useful astronomical functions, such as tracking the rise and set times for all visible planets. Apple & Android- Free "Best Hunting Apps" for iPad and iPhone Shot Simulator Many people originally confused this one for a game, as the interface closely resembles some of the best hunting game apps . However, this app is really designed to show you exactly how each shot would affect a deer based on the shot placement, trajectory and bullet speed. The app uses a detailed image of a deer, including the skeleton and internal organs, which can be used to help hunters understand more about where exactly they want to place their shots. RealTree Turkey Tips Similar to RealTree Archery Tips, this app provides hunters with a huge guide designed to improve turkey hunting success. Learn about the differences between hen and tom turkey tracks, find useful info about spur length, beards and more. RealTree Turkey Tips provides virtually everything you need to know to be a better turkey hunter. Apple only- Free iSolunar Hunting and Fishing Times Another solunar prediction app, iSolunar gives you up-to-date info about the best hunting and fishing times for your location—no matter where in the world you are. The app uses astronomical data provided by the US Naval Observatory to provide location-specific info on sunrise and sunset times and feeding and activity periods. With a simple, easy-to-use interface, this is definitely one of the best hunting apps for iPhone . Ballistic- Advanced Edition The most advanced, most accurate ballistics app on the market, Ballistic- Advanced Edition uses the renowned JBM Ballistics engine to provide super precise, instant calculations. The app features nearly 5,000 factory projectile loads, or you can input custom information for your own rounds. You can view graphs and charts of the bullet velocity, drop and energy, or check out the trajectory charts to view various trajectories based on angle and altitude. This is truly the most comprehensive ballistics app out there, and is a must-have for any serious tactical hunter. Apple only- $19.99 Hunting Season Countdown For those that are constantly counting down the days to hunting season, here’s an app that will do it all for you. Simply put in the exact day and time the season starts, and then click on the app whenever you wish to get an up-to-the-second countdown of when you can finally start hunting. Whitetail+ Made by North American Whitetail magazine , this is the magazine’s companion app where users can catch up on the latest news, connect with other hunters and share photos and stories of their latest hunt. You can also pose questions and receive answers from other users and the magazine’s editors, and the app also allows users to accumulate points that can be used to enter in contests and giveaways for gear and a range of other prizes. Apple only- Free Best Miscellaneous Hunting Apps Trophy Score Developed by Safari Club International, this app is a simplified version of SCI’s field scoring kit. It provides scoring books for North America, South America and Africa, allowing you to quickly calculate the score of your trophy before leaving the field. ScoreMyRack Similar to Trophy Score, ScoreMyRack is an Android app that allows hunters to automatically calculate the score of their trophy in the field. With this app, you’ll never again have to struggle to calculate the score manually, as you simply put in all the measurements and the app does the rest for you. Users can choose between a free, ad-supported version or an ad-free premium version. Android only- Free/ $1.99 (ScoreMyRack Premium) iHunt Journal A full hunting journal in the palm of your hand, this app lets you plan out your hunt using weather and lunar calendars, and then fully track your hunt using the built-in journal. The gallery lets you store and share photos of your trophy after a successful hunt, and you can even input info about the size and score of the animal, weather conditions, locations and even a personal story—all of which can be shared with other users. You can also view statistics about your hunts and trophies. Apple & Android- $8.99 (iTunes)/ $5.20 (Google Play) Where to Shoot While the previous app helps you figure out exactly where to place your shots, this particular app helps you find places to practice your shooting by showing you a list of all shooting ranges within your specified search area. The app is basically a giant list of virtually all shooting ranges in the United States and Canada, which is maintained by the National Shooting Sports Foundation , and you can search through the listings to find specific ranges based on your GPS or chosen location. Although it is definitely not the most useful app, it can still come in handy when you’d like to shoot a few practice rounds and your normal range is closed. Apple & Android- Free Shooting Hours Shooting Hours is another activity predictor app that uses your GPS to help you determine when in the morning and evening animals are most likely to be active. Instead of having to consult over sunrise and sunset tables, you can simply turn on the app and let it figure it all out for you. As well, the app can also be used to program in custom shooting hours based on your local regulations, ensuring that you don’t take that shot before or after the designated time. After setting in your custom hours, the app will vibrate to let you know when the shooting hours start and finish. Apple & Android- $0.99 Time2Hunt Available in both a free, ad-supported version (Time2Hunt Lite) and an ad-free paid version, Time2Hunt is another hunting prediction app. Like most others, this app provides solar and lunar data to help you calculate when the animals should be most active. It also features sunrise and sunset charts and can provide quite accurate predictions for the best times to hunt based on all available info. What Knot to Do (In the Great Outdoors) Produced by Columbia Sportswear Company, this app provides virtually everything you could need to know about knot tying. It features 70 of the most popular and useful knots, separated into six different categories. Each knot features detailed step-by-step instructions on how to tie it and illustrated examples. Apple only- Free PocketRanger This isn’t actually a single app, but a series of different apps that provide users with a huge range of info. Users can find Fish and Wildlife Guides for all 50 states, as well as state-specific apps providing detailed info about all of the state parks located within the specific state. As well, a full National Park guide is also available. Apple & Android- Free Gun Vault Pro A data management app designed for firearm owners, this app allows you to keep track of all of your guns. Users can upload up to two photos for each firearm, as well as additional info like serial numbers and any other details. As well, the app contains a handy reference guide containing all pertinent gun law and concealed carry permit for the entire United States. It also contains an Ammo Tracker and allows users to search for all shooting ranges and firearm supply stores within their area. Finally, the app also contains a transfer form to facilitate easier private gun sales. The app is fully lockable and password-protected, ensuring your info remains private. Android only- $1.49 Gun Safe Similar to Gun Vault Pro, Gun Safe allows users to store info about their firearms, ammo, hunting and gun permits, shooting sessions and much more. All photos and info is stored in a 256-bit AES encrypted database to ensure your privacy. Users can also record sales details for each firearm. Both a free and paid-for version of the app are available, and the paid version provides a few additional features, such as allowing users to view and print PDF bills of sale for their guns. Android only- Free (Gun Safe Free) or $4.99 HuntPlanner Make sure you’re fully prepared before heading out in the field. This simple app lets you view checklists for pre-season, post-season and scouting trips, ensuring you have all the gear you need. The app also contains checklists for bow hunting trips, rifle hunting, ammo, gear, electronics, documents, etc. Simply click on each item to cross it off the list, and make sure you’ve got everything you need. Apple & Android- Free PointHunter Never again miss an important permit application deadline. This app provides application deadline reminders for 43 US states, and also allows users in 13 states to instantly access their preference point totals and draw results. PointHunter currently supports deadlines for most big game species, including elk, mule deer, whitetails, bighorn sheep, mountain goats and elk. A truly useful app, PointHunter ensures you’ll always turn in your hunting permit applications on time. Apple & Android- Free RealTree Archery Challenge One of the most popular hunting game apps, RealTree Archery Challenge lets users test their archery skills. Attempt to hit the pop-up targets and test your skills through a range of different terrains. The game gets progressively harder as you go, and allows you to post your results to Facebook to see which one of your friends is the best bow hunter. Apple & Android- Free (also available in an online desktop version) RealTree ProHunter 3D Similar to RealTree Archery Challenge, this 3D hunting game lets users hunt a range of North America’s most popular game species. Track down elusive turkeys, trophy bucks, massive elk and even fierce black bears. Grab your rifle or bow and choose the best RealTree camo pattern for the terrain, and then head out to test your skills in the field. Apple only- Free The Final Word on the Best Apps for Hunting As you can see from this long list, there are really a ton of great hunting apps out there. While some of them are undoubtedly more useful than others, each of the hunting apps listed above can be quite handy in certain situations, and if not, they’re at least fun to play around with. So why not start downloading and see how the best hunting apps can help you. Contents Must-Haves: The 5 Best Hunting Apps of 2020 GEO-PAK Hunt SAS Survival Guide HuntStand HuntWise: The Hunting App OnXmaps HUNT Best "Bow Hunting Apps" ArcheryPal APPTitune RealTree Archery Tips "Best Calling Apps" Primos Hunting Calls: Speak the Language iHunt by Ruger "Predator Hunting Calls" Deer Calls and Tactics Pro Best GPS and "Property Management Apps" Whitetail "Freaks Property Management" ScoutLook Hunting (aka ScoutLook Hunting & Weather) Where To Hunt Google Earth "Best Weather Apps" for Hunting AccuWeather WeatherBug Primos Wind Sunrise Sunset Best Hunting Apps for iPad and iPhone Shot Simulator RealTree Turkey Tips iSolunar Hunting and Fishing Times Ballistic- Advanced Edition "Hunting Season Countdown" Whitetail+ Best "Miscellaneous Hunting Apps" Trophy Score ScoreMyRack iHunt Journal Where to Shoot Shooting Hours Time2Hunt What Knot to Do (In the Great Outdoors) PocketRanger Gun Vault Pro Gun Safe HuntPlanner PointHunter RealTree Archery Challenge RealTree ProHunter 3D "The Final Word" on the Best Apps for Hunting

Handgun Showdown Round 4: Glock 20 vs. Glock 21

I’ve always wondered about Glock’s weird naming scheme. I’ve asked a few people and read through online forum posts about it, but even with all the answers I got, it never really made sense. What gives? Case in point, the Glock 20 and the Glock 21 both have “2” as their first digit, and except for the fact that both handguns have nearly the exact same specs, they are two very different handguns by virtue of the cartridge they use. But you didn’t really come here to read about Glock’s naming scheme, did you? 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In case you missed it, in Round 1 of our series of Handgun Showdowns , we compared the Glock 22 and the Glock 23 and briefly touched on these subjects: Why the .40 S&W is a great option for self defense; And even if it can be easily done, why it would be kind of pointless to convert either the Glock 22 and the Glock 23 to accept .357 SIG rounds (unless you’re the type who likes to fix things that aren’t broken). The .40 S&W and the .357 SIG are both in the higher end of the ballistics performance spectrum as far as handgun calibers go, meaning that while both have their fair share of pros and cons, both can be really effective for their intended purpose: self defense. But if you didn’t know, both rounds wouldn’t have come to existence if the FBI didn’t choose the 10mm Auto as their next service handgun cartridge in 1989. Not a lot of people might be aware of it, but after what many consider to be the most violent FBI shootout in Miami in 1986 that led to the death of two FBI agents (and five other agents wounded), the need for a semi-auto handgun cartridge more powerful and more effective at stopping bad guys than the 9×19 Parabellum arose. The FBI agents used shotguns, 9mm pistols and revolvers chambered in .357 magnum and .38 special in that gunfight. Whether or not those handgun rounds’ abysmal ballistic performance was the reason for the agents’ failure to defend themselves against the two criminals they had a gunfight with remains questionable, at least to me . As far as I know, the weakest of the three, the .38 special, loaded with enough powder to propel a 158-grain lead semi-wadcutter hollowpoint bullet at speeds of ~1,100 feet per second out of a 4-inch barrel, should be more than enough to stop any bad guy provided the operator is capable of good shot placement — otherwise Massad Ayoob wouldn’t recommend it . Whichever the case may be, the FBI wanted a powerful handgun caliber in the aftermath of the shootout. They decided to choose the 10mm as the handgun caliber for their service pistols three years after the blood bath in Miami. Out of a 4.6-inch barrel, the 10mm cartridge can propel a .40-inch diameter 180-grain bullet at speeds of ~1,300 feet per second. It’s about as powerful as a heavy and hot-loaded .357 magnum or an entry .41 magnum load. Unfortunately, the 10mm proved a little too powerful that its recoil was borderline unmanageable (especially for FBI agents with shorter stature and smaller hands), that Smith and Wesson offered to down-load it a few years later for the FBI’s use. It resulted in the birth of the .40 S&W . Because of its power and the recoil that comes with it, the 10mm can’t be considered practical for military, law enforcement or civilian self defense use. Thus, it never gained the traction it needed to become as popular as its .40 “Short & Weak” offspring. But for hunting and self defense against two-legged critters in bear country, the 10mm can be really effective. It has gained a loyal fan base and has seen a resurgence in the last few years, so while ammo wouldn’t be as cheap as other more common handgun cartridges, availability won’t be an issue. The .45 ACP The .45 acp needs no introduction. Or maybe it does? Like the 10mm, the .45 acp also came about as an attempt to fill a need for a more powerful handgun caliber. Also like the 10mm, it eventually superseded the handgun cartridge the government previously issued — just at the time, it was the military that needed it, not the feds. During the Moro Rebellion that started in 1899, the US Cavalry only used .38 Long Colt-chambered double-action revolvers which proved ineffective against Philippine Muslim insurgents super-charged with adrenaline and were then locally known as the Moro Juramentados. These curvy-blade-wielding badasses were blinded by rage and religion, unrelenting and unyielding that even after being shot six times with .361-caliber bullets, they would still keep fighting . It was around this time when John Browning designed a .45-caliber cartridge to answer the military’s demand for a wider diameter bullet for use against the Moros. It passed all the rigorous tests the US military put it through. After some tweaks from a few different ammunition manufacturers, it was dubbed the .45 Automatic Colt Pistol cartridge in 1905. While the M1911 pistol , a handgun also designed by John Browning a few years after to chamber the .45 acp, was never actually used for its original purpose of stopping the Moros (because mass production only started in 1912, and the handguns would only reach US Army units a year later, just right after the last of the Moro battles was won), it quickly became popular in World War I . And perhaps ironically , the people it was designed for, the Moros, were eventually armed with M1911s and Thompson submachine guns by the US Military (both chambered for the .45 acp) to help Filipinos win the war against the Japanese during World War II. The Type 14 Nambu was no match against the M1911 The .45 acp can send a 230-grain .45-inch diameter bullet flying out of the 1911’s 5-inch barrel with speeds of up to 850 feet per second. Ballistics-wise, while it isn’t going to be as powerful as the 10mm by any stretch, it has been a proven man-stopper in several wars and armed conflicts. Its ballistic attributes, together with its relatively manageable recoil, is what made it a favorite among the military, law enforcement and civilians all over the world for well over a century after it was designed. And with the myriad of different handgun designs chambered for the .45 acp still being manufactured today, ammo will never be an issue. Another Glock vs. Glock comparison… why? Though these the Glock 20 and the Glock 21 are practically the same in terms of dimensions (the only difference being the guns’ weights and the rounds they’re chambered for), they do have a few noteworthy differences. Read on to know more. The Tale of the Tape Glock 20 Glock 21 Length: 8.03 in. Length: 8.03 in. Height: 5.47 in. Height: 5.47 in. Width: 1.27 in. Width: 1.27 in. Barrel Height: 1.26 in. Barrel Height: 1.26 in. Barrel Length: 4.60 in. Barrel Length: 4.60 in. Sight Radius: 6.02 in. Sight Radius: 6.02 in. Weight (mag empty): 30.71 oz. Weight (mag empty): 29.30 oz. Weight (mag full): 39.54 oz Weight (mag full): 38.30 oz. Trigger Pull: around 5.5 lbs. Trigger Pull: around 5.5 lbs. Trigger Travel: 0.49 in. Trigger Travel: 0.49 in. Barrel Rifling: right hand, hexagonal Barrel Rifling: right hand, octagonal Length of Twist: 1 in 9.84 in. Length of Twist: 1 in 15.75 in. Magazine Capacity: 15 rounds Magazine Capacity: 13 rounds Optional Mags: n/a Optional Mags: 10-round mags Besides the insignificant differences in loaded and unloaded weight, the round capacity for each handguns’ stock mags (15 vs. 13), and the optional aftermarket mags available for these pistols, looking at the table we see a hexagonal barrel rifling on the Glock 20’s side, while on the Glock 21’s it’s an octagonal barrel rifling. The length of rifling twist for each handgun’s barrel are also different. What’s so special about polygonal rifling? There are two types of rifling in gun barrels: Lands-and-Grooves (i.e. the traditional type), and Polygonal. Each rifling type has its own set of pros and cons. Lands-and-Grooves rifling tend to be more reliable as the square grooves can “trap” microscopic lead shavings, ergo the barrel remains unobstructed even after several shots without the user having to clean the barrel too often. This means it will be a bit more reliable than polygonal rifling because it won’t have problems shooting non-jacketed bullets (e.g. cast lead), allowing for more bullet choices . But the problem with those square grooves is they allow for relatively more gases to “leak” outside the barrel’s business end, which results in velocity loss (slightly less muzzle energy, slightly less accuracy). Barrels with this type of rifling also exhibit wear relatively faster. The Polygonal rifling works the opposite way . Its wavy grooves allow for tighter contact between the bullet’s and the barrel’s inner surface, resulting in less gas leak and less velocity loss (slightly more muzzle energy, slightly more accuracy). It also exhibits relatively less wear compared to traditional rifling. Its downside is, if lead bullets are fired constantly through the barrel, without the square grooves of traditional rifling to “trap” the lead particles, there will be faster lead build up, which could result to catastrophic failure of the barrel. This is why in their website FAQs , Glock specifies to never use non-jacketed bullets . So why does the Glock 21 have longer octagonal rifling? All Glocks chambered for the .45 acp bullets require more polygonal surfaces to provide a better gas seal compared to all other Glocks chambered for smaller-diameter bullets (i.e. bullets with .40-inch diameter or less). The longer rifling twist results in less bullet spin frequency. Considering that the .45 acp’s bullet velocity is on the lower end of the spectrum for handgun caliber ballistics performance, and the bullet’s dimensions don’t make it any better compared to other handgun caliber bullets as far as aerodynamics is concerned (it is a fat bullet which makes it comparatively short vis-a-vis the 9mm’s much thinner profile or the 10mm’s relatively thinner but longer bullets), it doesn’t need to spin as much . As far as we can tell, the longer rifling twist for all Glocks in .45 acp has negligible benefits, if any. We can only assume it’s a budget decision thing — in theory, barrels with longer rifling twists are faster to manufacture, which leads to faster turnaround and better productivity. But the octagonal rifling of the same barrels takes longer. Makes sense, right? If Glock would go balls-to-the-wall with .45 barrel rifling twist and make it 1:9.84, they probably wouldn’t be able to sell their .45 handguns at the consumer-friendly price points they’re currently at. Barrel Conversions: "The Great Divide" Now comes the fun part. The Glock 20 out of the box has been reported by numerous owners to chamber and reliably shoot the .40 S&W aside from the 10mm . This would be a huge topic in and of itself, and since a reputable website has already done extensive testing and proven that it’s safe to shoot the .40 S&W from the Glock 20 without any type of aftermarket parts being installed, we won’t talk about it in too much detail. Suffice it to say, this makes the Glock 20 awesome . Being able to chamber two different .40-caliber rounds makes it great for a dual caliber platform, pretty much like how the .357 magnum can shoot .38 special rounds without issues. Disclaimer: Even if it has been proven safe by some random guy on the interwebz, shooting .40 S&W rounds in a stock Glock 20 is still not something we would recommend, because of how easy it is to just drop in an aftermarket conversion barrel , and we never know when Murphy’s Law might kick in. But if you still want to experiment with your Glock 20, you better be prepared to clean its barrel’s chamber far more often than you normally would if you were only shooting 10mm in it. The reason for this is simple: the .40 S&W’s shorter overall length will force the bullet out of the chamber much earlier compared to the 10mm, and because of this, there will be that tiny gap between the chamber and the barrel where crud can accumulate, which will result in barrel fouling and eventually, a catastrophic failure. It’s the same dilemma owners of .357 magnum revolvers face when they shoot a lot of .38 specials in their wheelgun. Do it at your own risk. In addition, the Glock 20 can be converted easily to 9mm, .38 Super, .357 SIG and 9×25 Dillon (essentially a .357 SIG in steroids) with just a barrel and recoil spring swap (but it’ll need new mags for 9mm and .38 super). The Glock 20 can also be converted to the .45 acp but because its slide breech face and barrel hole are just too small for the .45 acp’s fat barrel to slide through, you’ll need a complete Glock 21 upper (which would essentially make it a Glock 21). Now if you thought the Glock 20 is awesome, the Glock 21 is even more awesome . For one thing, it can be converted easily to 10mm with only a barrel and recoil spring swap. And the Glock 20 upper is compatible with the Glock 21 lower, which would essentially transform it to a Glock 20 as well. The Glock 21 can also be converted to .50 GI, .400 Corbon, 10mm, .40 Super, .45 Super, and the .460 Rowland which is definitively the most powerful big-bore semi-automatic cartridge that can be used for regular-sized, compact and subcompact semi-auto production handguns (we are aware of the existence of other rather obscure handgun calibers like those the Wildey Magnums and the Desert Eagle use — those handguns don’t count). With all these conversions, we would be tempted to say both handguns are about even. But if we don’t count conversions using complete upper assemblies (i.e. the slide, barrel and recoil spring), the Glock 21 can be easily converted to six different calibers while the Glock 20 can only be easily converted to four. And if we look at each of the above-mentioned handgun calibers’ ballistic performance, we’ll notice that the more powerful caliber conversions are also on the Glock 21 . "Aftermarket Parts Availability" These are both Glocks. Availability for upgrades won’t be an issue. And both have the same accessory rail in front of the frame so you can attach a laser or a flashlight if you want. Ease Of Concealment Regarding concealment, Glock isn’t marketing any of these two pistols as conceal-carry weapon (CCW) options because both are full-sized handguns. The subject of having a full-sized Glock handgun was covered in Round 3 of this Handgun Showdown series, check it out if you want to know more. You can still try and conceal either pistol, but it’s totally up to the type of clothing you’ll wear and what holster you’ll use . As for me, if I wanted an easily concealable Glock in 10mm, I’d get the Glock 29 . If I want an easily concealable Glock in .45 acp, I’d get the Glock 30 . Pricing Nothing much can be said about pricing. Both handguns are priced exactly the same, info taken from Glock’s website . The Gen4 variant for each costs $599, while the Gen3SF (short frame) variant for each is a bit cheaper at $547 base price. If you want to know why the Gen3s are cheaper than the Gen4s, You can find them here . If not, feel free to jump to the Conclusion. Conclusion Ah, it’s conclusion time again. I can talk all day about how the Glock 20 can be better than the Glock 21 and vice-versa, but I’ll try and sum everything up in a few bulletpoints. The Glock 20 chambered for the 10mm will be the better pick under the following conditions: If you want a good plastic handgun out of the box without upgrades for hunting up to bear-size game ; If you’re the type of cheapskate who takes high risks and reap relatively small rewards (you can shoot .40 S&W in a stock Glock 20) just for the heck of it; If you fancy doing barrel conversions for any of these four handgun calibers: 9mm, .38 Super, .357 SIG and 9×25 Dillon; If you’re great at handloading and you don’t mind down-loading 10mm to .40 S&W ballistics for self-defense (assuming you’re not the cheapskate who likes to take risks); Or if you’re a recent 10mm cult convert . On the other hand, the Glock 21 chambered for the .45 acp will be the better pick under the following conditions : If you’re a semi-auto handgun purist who believes that the .45 acp is the be-all and end-all of handgun calibers for self defense (like myself) — but you want to try a striker-fired pistol for a change, because you’re getting tired of your all-steel 1911 ; If you want the perfect dual-caliber semi-automatic plastic handgun platform for both self defense and hunting (thank God for the .44 magnum and Johnny Rowland); If you fancy doing barrel conversions for any of these six handgun calibers (because you want the more powerful conversion options): .50 GI, .400 Corbon, 10mm, .40 Super, .45 Super, and .460 Rowland. If you run into some deranged Czech sporting a 14-round 7.5 FK BRNO (a crazy-expensive handgun that fires a .29-caliber bullet with .44 magnum ballistic performance) and you want the best possible double stack .44 magnum-class semi-auto plastic handgun to even the odds… uhm yeah I think this is highly unlikely because Czechs are smart. But you get the point . For all intents and purposes, both handguns are about equal, which makes this showdown a wash . The Glock 21 in my opinion has the slight upper hand , if only for the fact that you can easily convert it to shoot 10mm without having to purchase the Glock 20’s full upper. The same thing can’t be done with the Glock 20. If you’re interested in one of these, or even both of them, make sure to check out the best Glock shoulder holster . But all barrel conversions aside, what it all boils down to is your intended purpose . Related Reads: Best Glock 20 Holsters Best G21 Holsters 5/5 (1 Review) Mike Ramientas A firearms and ballistics enthusiast and an outdoorsman, Mike is one of Gun News Daily's best contributing authors. He's a researcher, data analyst and writer by trade and strongly adheres to conservatism—a stalwart of the right to keep and bear arms. 4 COMMENTS Joe Simeone June 8, 2018 at 5:41 pm Great Pro / Con write up. I was always intrigued wit the .45 Super. I have a 21 gen 4, would I need a recoil spring change or just go ahead and shoot some .45 super as is. I know the Super has thicker brass, to handle the increased pressure. Thank You for your time Mike J. Simeone Reply Mike Ramientas June 8, 2018 at 9:25 pm Joe, Thanks for reading the article. I’m happy to provide info on your inquiry. There’s a few things to consider if you want to safely shoot .45 Super out of your Glock 21 Gen4. Some people say the slide, barrel and recoil spring assembly have to be replaced. I think you don’t need an extra slide because that’s what you’ll replace the recoil spring assembly for. From what I know, Glock 21’s stock recoil spring weight is 17 lbs. You’ll need at least a 24-lb recoil spring to be able to shoot .45 Super without worrying that your slide will crack from the excessive force of the .45 Super’s recoil. If you have a 24-lb spring (or heavier if you’re shooting hotter .45 Super loads), you don’t need a stronger slide. As for the barrel, I believe Glock 21 stock barrels (even Gen4s’) don’t fully support the .45acp’s case head, but given the .45acp’s relatively low pressures (21,000psi SAAMI) it’ll be fine as long as you don’t load it with anything more powerful. That said, the .45 Super has 1/3 more pressure and without full case head support you run the risk of a kaboom not to mention you might lose a portion of your hands. Now back to the slide. If you’re not recoil shy and you’re okay with the .45 Super’s recoil, and the .45 Super barrel you end up buying isn’t ported, you have another reason not to buy a new slide. However, if you would end up hating its recoil at some point, you have the option to have the barrel ported, if this is the case you might want to get a stronger slide and have it ported too. Otherwise you should be able to get a barrel with an integrated muzzle brake. I’d recommend you contact Lone Wolf. I’m not updated with their prices but they should be able to outfit your G21 with the appropriate-weight dual captive spring+guide rod and a solid barrel with full case head support. And while you’re at it, you might want to check out the .460 Rowland which is even more powerful than the .45 Super. If you’d be spending north of $300 to convert to .45 Super, you may as well just get a .460 Rowland conversion kit. You’ll love it. -Mike Reply Jason September 4, 2018 at 7:40 pm I love my g21 40 super great woods gun!!! Reply Mike A November 26, 2018 at 11:34 pm Mike: Which are the 6 calibers the G21 can convert without a full slide assembly swap? You infer that the 50GI is one, but I’m not familiar with any 50GI conversions that aren’t full slide assembly conversions. I could very well be wrong, of course. Or maybe I misunderstood the 6. 400 Corbon is easy, followed by 45 Sup and 460. Good comparison overall, thanks! Mike Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

14 Best Service Pistols Of The World

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s What’s the most diverse group of guns in use by the world’s military forces? It’s not rifles, or machine guns, or submachine guns, or even shotguns. Most successful long-gun fall into just a few different designs. When you see oddball service rifles, you often see them plagued by issues of all kinds I.E. the INSAS, the FAMAS, the SA-80, and even the G36 have all had their problems. And yes, we know the M16 had issues also. The most diverse group of military weapons are handguns, aka sidearms. Even within certain countries, pistols can be diversely issued depending on the unit and mission. Sometimes pistols are such a second thought they are a mishmash of different guns. For example, see Israel at the near end of this list. Another challenge is how countries outside of Western Europe equip their military forces. In the Western World, there is a big move towards standardization that’s not present with other countries. U.S. Army new M17 Several countries also don’t put out a press release when they purchase or adopt a new handgun, making it difficult to verify the information. To be entirely fair, sidearms are just a step above bayonets on the necessity of military equipment priorities. Most countries issue them in small numbers to officers and specialists. I put my best foot forward to come up with a comprehensive list of the sidearms from around the world. It was a little harder than I initially thought, but the research was still fascinating and fun. With all this in mind, I’ve tried my hardest to verify the issuance of every firearm on this list. I set my parameters to general issue sidearms. Some Special ops teams may use something different than the standard forces, and trying to catalog these weapons along with general sidearms would take several articles. For example, the United States military alone issues the Beretta M9, the M17/18, the MEU/SOC 1911, the SIG P226, the M11A1, the P229R, the Glock 34, Glock 17, Glock 19, Glock 22, and many more we’ve likely never seen. It’s much more reasonable to focus on the general issue sidearms of these military forces. Since several military forces have adopted the same gun, we’ll group those together to simplify things. Table of Contents Loading... 1. United States – SIG P320 Designated the M17/18 I was lucky enough to be at SHOT Show when it was announced that the SIG P320 would be adopted for military service with the U.S. Army. Needless to say, the folks at the SIG booth were quite excited. Sig Sauer, SHOT 2018, colorized The P320, designated the M17 and M18, was adopted in 9mm in full size (M17) and compact (M18) variants. The M17/18 series are quite advanced for military sidearms and feature red dot optics compatibility. Although red dots have not been issued as far as I know. P320-M17 Like the P320 the ability exists to move the serialized fire control group to different grip modules. The military is quite strict with serial numbers and if the military allows the issued troop to choose a grip module they could get a gun that fits them. One size fits all is rarely a good idea. Of course, the U.S. Military is nanny like and included a manual safety. In reality, more training would be more beneficial than a manual safety, but who am I to judge big army. The M17 has since been adopted by the Air Force, the Navy, and the Marines. The M17 is currently being issued to combat arms units first in the U.S. Army. The Army plans to replace every M9 within ten years with an M17/18. New Military Standard Sig Sauer M17 650 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 650 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 2. Commonwealth Club – The Browning Hi-Power Canada, Australia, Bahrain, India, Thailand The Browning Hi-Power is the European 1911. FN Browning Hi-Power What I mean by that is its popularity and longevity in military service. The Hi-Power has been used by just about everybody and in only the last few years have more modern designs replaced it. Original World War II Era Browning Hi-Power The Hi-Power was one of the first high capacity 9mms that entered regular service. It’s a single action only weapon with a manual safety and a 13 round magazine. The Hi-Power is a beautiful gun that is robust and reliable. It’s close to 100 years old and is still seeing war. It’s one of the few guns to see action on both sides of WW2 in service with numerous Allied Forces, including the British, and in the hands of Germans. The Hi-Power is an excellent firearm and was a final fitting design for John Browning. Its legacy of service across the world is nearly unmatched. Much like the sun never sets on the British empire, the sun doesn’t set on the Hi-Power. While it’s been produced mostly in Europe, the gun is also widely built in South American factories as well. Modern Browning Hi-Power Mark III with World War II Era Hi-Power It’s been heavily used in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and South America. From imported goods to domestic production copies, the Hi-Power is a legend in small arms design. It’s currently the issued sidearm of Commonwealth countries like Canada and Australia, and as far out as India and Thailand. Canadian Hi-Power 3. 20+ Nations – The Glock 17, 19, and 34. The United Kingdom, Sweden, Austria, Finland, Malaysia, Mexico (Navy), Montenegro, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Switzerland, Yemen, Venezuela, Uruguay, India, and many more . It would seemingly be easier to make a list of countries the Glock 9mm series doesn’t serve in. The weapon seems to be everywhere in the world. Glock 19 Why not? The 9mm Glocks are the flagship of their handguns, and the only difference between the 17, 19, and 34 is barrel and grip length. Glock 9mm pistols are legendary for their rugged and reliable design. These superbly simple guns work, and keep working. On top of that, Glock has logistics nailed with supplies and spare parts out the yin yang. UK Glock 17 Generation wise it appears that Gen 3 and Gen 4 models are the most popular variants in the military market. The Glock series also seems to be the most popular choice in countries where Spec Ops have more leeway in choosing a handgun. The Glock series of firearms are popular the world over for a good reason. They are accurate, easy to use, highly reliable, lightweight, and cheap. The price Glock sells their guns to Police Forces is criminally low, and I imagine the price for military forces is even smaller. Penny pinchers often give a big say when it comes to new guns, and price always matters. Glock makes their weapons affordable while being high quality. As far as military sidearms go the Glock 17 will likely remain the most popular choice for some time to come. If you want to get your own Glock, you should take a look at some of these articles: Best Glock (All Sizes & Calibers) Best 9mm Glock Best Glock Upgrades Glock 19 570 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 570 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Guns.Com (See Price) GunBroker.Com (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 4. Germany, Ireland, Greece, and Spain – The HK U.S.P. I love the HK U.S.P. It’s one of my favorite DA/SA guns, and that’s saying a lot. The U.S.P., or universal self-loading pistol, is Heckler and Koch’s premier handgun design. Germans with their HK USP It’s a fascinating gun and while 9mm is the chosen NATO cartridge the USP was one of the first guns built around the 40 S&W. The gun was also chambered in 357 SIG, and later 45 A.C.P. HK45 USP with mounted light The U.S.P. stood apart from other polymer-frame guns of the time due to its mechanical recoil reduction system. This system is implemented with a heavy captive coil spring around the guide rod that reduced the force of the slide slinging rearward. This buffers recoil by up to 30% according to H.K. The U.S.P. came to be because of the Offensive Handgun Weapon System, where it was tested alongside prototypes of the Mk 23 Mod 0. From the very beginning the gun was always meant to be a service pistol. HK USP 45 Tactical 840 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 840 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing As a service weapon, it has been adopted by at least four countries as the general issue sidearm. In several more countries, it serves as a pistol for Special Operations units. Plus the U.S.P. C. is Jack Bauer’s gun of choice. 5. The French – M.A.C. Mle 50 and PAMAS G1 I’m not picking on the French, but any look into their current small arms will find them lacking. Their military is often ignored and their weapons are often quite old. There are two current service pistols in use, and neither is a new design. French army MAC50 First we have the ancient, but domestically designed M.A.C. Mle 50 and then the PAMAS G1. The PAMAS G1 is a licensed clone of the Beretta 92F and is built in France. The 30-year-old G1 was supposed to replace the MAC Mle 50, but it seems the process has been moving along very slowly. They are looking to now replace both pistols as of March 2019. The M.A.C. Mle 50 is a product of its time, and as a gun designed in 1950, that means it’s a single stack 9mm with nine rounds and a single-action design. It uses the Browning system like a Hi-Power and has an integral barrel feed ramp. The M.A.C. 50 is a stout little gun that’s known for its durability, clearly, since it’s been around for nearly 70 years now. The PAMAS G1 is a clone of the Beretta 92F made in France. There are a few differences between the PAMAS G1 and Beretta 92F. The G1 has a decocking lever only, and apparently, the French steel is more brittle. Since it’s a 92F, it lacks the enlarged hammer axis pin that prevents the slide from accidentally leaving the gun and hitting the operator in the face. However, there is some speculation this was initially caused by +P+ ammo. PAMAS G1 The French will likely adopt a Glock pistol, but until then, the M.A.C. and PAMAS are chugging along. The PAMAS is certainly a step up from the MAC, but both are likely well past their service life. 6. South Korea – The Daewoo K5 South Korea has a robust and well established domestic arms production history. Rather than just relying on the U.S., the Daewoo brand has produced most of South Korea’s military firearms. The Daewoo K5 is an innovative and exciting firearm design that has served the Koreans since 1989. Daewoo K5 The Daewoo K5 is a DA/SA pistol with a hammer, made on metal frame and is chambered in 9mm. The Daewoo K5 holds 15 rounds of 9mm, and in 1989 was quite high tech. It’s slightly dated now, but still an excellent combat pistol. The K5 features an unusual trigger mechanism, sometimes called Triple action or Double action +. It’s quite similar to the P99, except with an actual hammer-fired handgun. The K5’s hammer can be decoked, while still maintaining mainspring compression. The DP51 is the export version of the K5 The end result is a trigger pull with the length of a double-action trigger, but the weight of a single-action design. In the states, the Lionheart imported pistol had the same innovative feature. The K5 is a fascinating gun, and in 1989 showed a lot of innovative thought from Daewoo and South Korea. Daewoo is an interesting company. They make everything from TVs to Cars, and handguns and assault rifles. If you need a slow, fuel-efficient car and a machine gun, call Daewoo. 7. China – Type 92 The Type 92, aka the QSZ-92, is China’s primary service sidearm. This recoil-operated, locked-breech pistol has a rotating barrel locking system like the Beretta PX4 series. This rotating barrel setup is supposed to improve reliability and decrease recoil. Chinese Type 92 This is an interesting little gun, and it was ahead of its time. The Type 92 was designed in 1994 and featured a detachable steel frame that holds the fire control group. This sits in the plastic grip and acts very much like a SIG P320’s FCU. The frame can be removed and moved into different sized frames and grip designs. Whether or not this was ever done remains to be seen. The gun is also chambered in the very odd 5.8x21mm round. This was China’s variant of the 5.7 and was designed to defeat soft armor. Popular Pistol Calibers It holds 20 rounds of the 5.8×21 round in a double-stack magazine and has a combination safety/decocker. It’s a DA/SA design and is issued lightly among Chinese forces. 9mm variants also exist for export… for reasons. I’m betting the 5.8 round handles a lot like the 5.7, and it’s a shame we can’t find out for ourselves. 8. Russia – Makarov, and MP-443 Russian is a weird country for small arms. Admittedly they are much more focused on their rifles than their handguns. That’s why the Makarov pistol is still around and kicking in use by their military forces. This Great Value brand Walther PP has been serving since 1951. Rusian Makarov RT It’s a blowback-operated design that’s very compact for a service pistol. When your handgun is more or less used for executing traitors and subjugating people, I guess size doesn’t matter. The Makarov had a capacity of 8 rounds of what is essentially a +P .380 ACP round. The most impressive thing about the Makarov is the fact it’s made of only 27 parts. This was perfect for the Soviet Union at the time. It is cheap and easy to produce, and had very few failure points. The Makarov pistol has been around for so long because the former Soviet Union produced millions of them, and they are robust little pistols. The MP 443 Grach, aka the PYa, is a more modern Russian service pistol that aims to replace the Makarov. The MP 443 is a modern 9mm Parabellum pistol with a 17 or 18 round magazine capacity. The MP 443 is slowly making its way into the hands of Russian forces, and the gun has been in mass production for eight years now. Russian MP443 The MP 443 is pretty standard as far as pistols go. It’s a DA/SA design that does allow the user to swap the slide stop lever and manual safety to the right and left sides of the gun. The MP 443 uses a Colt-Browning design and doesn’t do anything revolutionary. So it’s a lot unlike bored Russians in that sense. It is an all-steel gun, and while this adds to the gun’s weight, it is quite robust and durable. It needs to be to use the Russian armor piercing 9mm 7N21 armor-piercing round. This s a +P+ style round apparently and is a hard hitter Russian 7N21 AP 9mm The MP 443 is another gun we will likely never see, but I doubt it does anything an old SW 3rd gen doesn’t do. 9. Belgium – FN Five-Seven The Belgium FN Five-Seven pistol is an interesting firearm. It fires the 5.7x28mm round and was developed to share ammunition with the FN P90 PDW. The round it fires is similar to a rifle round in design and shape. Five-SeveN with Ammo and Mag 2 While the ammunition is long, it’s thin, and this allows the Five-Seven to hold 20 rounds in a flush-fitting magazine. The Five-Seven offers soft armor penetration and very low recoil on top of a flat shooting cartridge that can reach out to 100 yards. This is a very easy shooting gun, and I can see why a military would adopt it. Plus it’s lightweight, reliable, and is unlike most handguns when it comes to armor and barrier penetration. The gun and the ammo is quite pricey though. The gun is Belgium designed and is currently replacing the Browning Hi-Power with the Belgium Army. The Five-Seven also serves the Air Force, Special Forces Group, and Federal Police forces. The Five-Seven is an unconventional choice but is an effective weapon. Most Innovative Handgun FN Five-seveN 1380 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1380 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing And of course, it is the firearm of Ivan Chesnokov fame. We literally cannot think about the FN Five-seveN without thinking of Ivan Chesnokov. 10. Czech Republic – C.Z. 75 Phantom The Czech Republic has a long history of private firearms ownership and is one of the few European countries to have a strong firearm’s civil rights. C.Z. is also one of my favorite personal gun makers. Czech soldier with CZ 75 Phantom The C.Z. 75 has been used extensively by their military for quite some time, and still serves in reserve units. The C.Z. 75 Phantom is now the primary service pistol. This gun is similar in design to the classic C.Z. 75 but features a polymer frame, Picatinny rail, and a decocker only design. It also uses a larger 19 round magazine, but can also work with classic C.Z. 75 mags. Lots of CZ 75 mags The C.Z. 75 Phantom is a robust and accurate weapon. The ergonomics are simply incredible, and C.Z. isn’t afraid to sell the gun in the States, so yay for us. The Phantom is a service pistol with the handling of a competition gun. It has an excellent trigger, a low bore axis, and is well proven. The Phantom is an excellent gun, and it was a great choice by the Army of the Czech Republic. 11. South Africa – Vektor Z88 and SP1 South Africa has an exciting history of arms design and has both cloned and created their weapons. Their service handguns are a mixture of both. The Z88 was a domestically produced clone of the Beretta 92. Vektor SP1 They couldn’t license it or receive handgun imports due to the arms embargo on South Africa at the time. Beretta also couldn’t sue because South African’s couldn’t come to court to defend themselves. The Z88 was a direct clone of the Beretta 92 and, as such, is a DA/SA gun with a decoking safety and a 15 round magazine. The Z88 was a very well done clone and helped modernize the South African military. It still serves today in a limited role. Z88 and SP1, Forgotten Weapons After the sanctions were lifted, Beretta was in a place where they could file lawsuits, so South Africa wisely changed the design and came up with the Vektor SP1. This gun utilized the same basic Beretta design with some changes. The safety was moved to the frame, the barrel was no longer exposed, and a 40 S&W variant was created. The SP1 is a metal frame pistol, and it still utilizes Beretta magazines. It currently serves the South African National Defence Force and the Police Service. It admittedly looks very cool and while limited numbers were imported to the States I’ve never seen one in person. The SP1 is reportedly a well made combat handgun, and since the weapon is based on a Beretta 92 it’s got a solid platform to start on. South Africa apparently likes the weapon enough that they’ve yet to start shopping for a new sidearm, even without an arms embargo. 12. Italy – Beretta 92FS Beretta, the world’s oldest still-operating arms company, is an Italian firm. Are we at all surprised that the Italians are using one of Beretta’s most legendary handguns ? The 92FS has served several countries as a military and police sidearm, including our own, for more than 30 years. Beretta 92FS The Italian military uses the Beretta 92FS. This DA/SA design features one of the best stock factory triggers on the market. The 92FS has a combination safety and decocker and excellent ergonomics outside of the safety. The 92FS in it’s M9 form was the gun I used and it’s an excellent weapon. The 92FS is robust, reliable, and well-proven. The direct feed system and open slide design greatly increase the gun’s reliability. Beretta’s and the U.S. Army’s numerous testing has shown that the weapon is extremely reliable and can take a ton of abuse before it cracks. The all-metal frame pistol has very low recoil and handles like a dream. It’s perfect for both new recruits and expert shots. The 92FS is Italy’s standard service pistol, and there doesn’t seem to be a rush to swap it out. Beretta 92FS 670 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 670 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing 13. Brazil – Taurus PT-92 The PT-92 is the Brazillian copy of the Beretta 92, made by Brazillian firm Taurus. It’s not an identical copy of the Beretta. Taurus makes these guns on original Beretta machinery left behind after Beretta’s military contract expired in Brazil. PT 92 The Taurus PT-92’s most significant and most noticeable change from the Italian Stallion was the use of a frame-mounted combination safety and decocker. Other than that, the PT-92 handles almost identically to the Beretta 92. This includes the DA/A design, the direct feed design, and the double-stack magazine. The PT-92 has been serving the Brazillian military for decades now without much issue. The teething problems the Taurus guns sometimes have are seemingly not present in the P.T. 92’s design. 14. Israel… A Little Bit of Everything Tracking down one service pistol for the Israeli army isn’t easy. It seems like they keep a bit of everything around. The domestically produced Jericho pistol is in the inventory, as well as the SIG P226 and 228, the Hi-Power, the Glock 17 and 19 models, and more. Sig Sauer 226 Researching this article has shown me that service pistols in the Israeli Army are highly uncommon. The Special Forces and Intelligence agencies all seem to have their particular pistol. I mean, does the Uzi pistol count as a pistol? Sure, this was the full-sized Uzi. But it was still his CCW! The one common thread between Israeli pistols is that they are all quality options. They are well made, proven guns with a long history of service and success. Conclusion Service pistols are such a diverse subject to cover, guns that include both past and present designs. The current field of Service pistols around the world is massive, and I was left exhausted after researching and writing this article. Service pistols are a fascinating subject to research, and I’m surprised to see such exciting diversity. I can’t possibly have conquered them all, so I ask you fine folks in the comments, which ones have I missed? Want more…check out Police Sidearms: From Past to Present .

Summary

LAST UPDATED: June 26th 2020 GUIDE: Chris Browning Maybe you’re looking at buying a Ruger American semi-automatic pistol. Like me, you might have searched their website and… whoa! There are more than a dozen to choose from . What’s the difference between them? And how can you make up your mind? You should consider what you want to do with your Ruger.